Health

  • June 12, 2024

    Indiana Hospital Gets $11M Leg Amputation Verdict Reversed

    An Indiana state appeals court has upended a $1.3 million judgment — originally a $11 million verdict — awarded to a patient whose leg was amputated allegedly due to the negligence of a hospital, its physician and nurse, citing a slew of "cumulative errors" the lower court made during the trial.

  • June 12, 2024

    Yale Hospital OK With Merging Scrapped $435M Sale Suits

    Yale New Haven Hospital has consented to combining two dueling lawsuits over its stalled $435 million deal to buy three Connecticut facilities operated by California-based Prospect Medical Holdings Inc., agreeing that judicial efficiency and economy is best served by consolidating both entities' claims into one proceeding.

  • June 12, 2024

    Texas Anesthesia Co. Appealing To Duck FTC Suit To 5th Circ.

    U.S. Anesthesia Partners Inc. gave notice Wednesday that it will ask the Fifth Circuit to review a Texas federal judge's mid-May decision refusing to toss Federal Trade Commission allegations of a monopolistic "roll-up" of Lone Star State anesthesia practices.

  • June 12, 2024

    SEIU Unit On Hook For $6M In HCA Healthcare Strike Spat

    An arbitrator has found a Service Employees International Union affiliate liable for more than $6 million in damages for replacement worker costs from a strike, a California hospital said Wednesday, while a union representative told Law360 that the decision is "outrageous and unprecedented."

  • June 12, 2024

    Doctor Says Lawyer, Insurer Agreed To Backdoor Settlement

    A Colorado neurosurgeon accused an attorney and an insurer of interfering with the legal services provided to him in defense of an underlying medical malpractice suit, telling a state court the underlying suit was settled without his consent, elevating the carrier and its insured's interests over his own.

  • June 12, 2024

    SPAC Dealmakers Expect Modest Pickup After Market Bottom

    Market professionals expect a slow pickup in deals involving special-purpose acquisition companies starting in the second half of 2024, predicting on Wednesday that a leaner market will emerge following the recent crash and imposition of tighter regulations.

  • June 12, 2024

    'Natural' Toothpaste Brand Loaded With PFAS, Moms Say

    Natural toothpaste company RiseWell LLC falsely advertised its kids toothpaste as "natural" and "safe to swallow," two mothers alleged Tuesday in a proposed class action, saying a U.S. Department of Defense-certified laboratory test found 750 times more "forever chemicals" in the toothpaste than researchers found in heavily tainted kale.

  • June 12, 2024

    32 AGs Urge Justices Take Up Oklahoma PBM Law Fight

    Thirty-two attorneys general urged the U.S. Supreme Court to take up Oklahoma's petition for review of a Tenth Circuit decision holding that federal law preempted portions of a state law regulating pharmacy benefit managers, arguing the justices needed to intervene to resolve a circuit split.

  • June 12, 2024

    FTC Asks 4th Circ. To Pause Novant Hospital Purchase

    The Federal Trade Commission has asked the Fourth Circuit to pause Novant Health's purchase of a North Carolina hospital while enforcers appeal an order from the lower court that refused to put the deal on hold for the commission's in-house merger challenge.

  • June 12, 2024

    Conn. Justices Nix Health Dept. Worker's Whistleblower Claim

    The Connecticut Supreme Court has trounced a public health official's claim that she was fired for blowing the whistle on appointees who lacked mandatory credentials, upholding her termination but also backing her simultaneous pursuit of a union grievance and an administrative complaint.

  • June 12, 2024

    Transit Insurer Seeks To Limit Loss From $60M No-Fault Scam

    A taxi and livery insurer told a Brooklyn federal judge Wednesday that it is pursuing settlement in its effort to recoup $3.2 million lost in a massive, $60 million no-fault scam led by a former clinic operator now headed for prison.

  • June 12, 2024

    House Dems Seek Criminal Penalties For PE Hospital 'Looters'

    A pair of Democratic senators are targeting private equity's role in the healthcare industry, introducing new legislation Tuesday that would give federal and state enforcers new tools to go after firms they say are "looting" hospital systems and other providers, including possibly jailing executives if patient deaths result.

  • June 11, 2024

    Pa. Health System Shakes Meta Data Sharing Row For Now

    A Pennsylvania federal judge has tossed a putative class action accusing a nonprofit health system of unlawfully sharing information about website visitors' activities with Meta Platforms Inc., finding that the plaintiff had failed to adequately detail what protected health data had been disclosed. 

  • June 11, 2024

    Psychiatrist Can't Ax Verdict Over ADHD Drug Death

    A Missouri appeals court on Tuesday refused to let a psychiatrist off the hook for a $5 million jury verdict — later reduced to less than $1 million — that found that he had negligently prescribed amphetamines to a patient with a history of abusing them, ultimately resulting in a brain hemorrhage that killed her.

  • June 11, 2024

    Ohio Justices Will Review Bid To Toss Neck Injury Suit

    The Ohio Supreme Court said on Tuesday it would review an appellate court decision that pulled Mid-Ohio Physicians LLP and one of its doctors back into a medical malpractice lawsuit after they had escaped liability by leaning on the statute of limitations.

  • June 11, 2024

    6th Circ. Judge Doubts Clinic's Standing To Block Bias Law

    During Sixth Circuit arguments Tuesday probing whether a Christian medical clinic can block Michigan from targeting it for refusing to facilitate gender transitions, one judge searched for evidence that the clinic is actually at risk of being prosecuted under the state's civil rights law.

  • June 11, 2024

    Ontrak CEO Told Broker To Sell Shares Quickly, Jury Hears

    A stockbroker testifying Tuesday in the California federal insider trading trial for Ontrak's founder said the executive didn't accept his advice to delay selling shares of the healthcare company to avoid the appearance of trading on insider information, but instead insisted on selling the shares immediately.

  • June 11, 2024

    9th Circ. Judge On Theranos Appeal: 'Good Story' For Holmes

    Two Ninth Circuit judges on a three-judge panel expressed concerns Tuesday that the district judge presiding over convicted former Theranos CEO Elizabeth Holmes' criminal trial erred by allowing a layperson witness to offer expert testimony at trial, with one judge saying, "There's a pretty good story here for Ms. Holmes."

  • June 11, 2024

    Miss. Urges 5th Circ. To Approve Ban On Medical Pot Ads

    The state of Mississippi has told the Fifth Circuit that it should uphold state restrictions barring advertising for medical marijuana, saying that the First Amendment cannot protect such speech because marijuana is federally illegal.

  • June 11, 2024

    Texas, Mont. Sue HHS Over ACA Trans Discrimination Rule

    Texas and Montana filed suit against the Biden administration seeking to halt its rule clarifying the application of the Affordable Care Act's nondiscrimination protections to gender identity, saying the new regulations infringe on states' autonomy and force them to violate their own laws.

  • June 11, 2024

    Judge Says Fla. Trans Medical Care Ban Is Unconstitutional

    A Florida federal judge on Tuesday declared that a state law banning gender-affirming care for transgender minors and restricting it for adults is unconstitutional because it was motivated by animus for a specific group of people and serves no legitimate state interest.

  • June 11, 2024

    Poor Monitoring Killed Anesthesia Patient, Conn. Jury Hears

    An anesthesiology group should be held liable for a patient's death because a doctor and nurse failed to adequately monitor the woman's vital signs through multiple doses of the anesthetic propofol, causing her blood oxygen levels to drop and her heart to stop, a Connecticut jury heard Tuesday morning.

  • June 11, 2024

    FTC Gets Short Extension On Novant Deal Pause

    A North Carolina federal court Tuesday extended an order preventing Novant Health from closing its $320 million deal for a pair of hospitals in the state by 10 days to give the Federal Trade Commission time to ask the Fourth Circuit to pause the transaction.

  • June 11, 2024

    Kirkland-Led InTandem Capital Lands $715M For 3rd Fund

    New York-based healthcare services-focused private equity firm InTandem Capital Partners LLC, advised by Kirkland & Ellis LLP, on Tuesday announced that it has clinched its third private equity fund, above target with $715 million in tow.

  • June 11, 2024

    Retrial Begins In NJ Fraud Case Over COVID Test Kit Deal  

    The painstaking process of jury selection got underway Tuesday in the retrial of a securities fraud case that ended with a dramatic mistrial after a juror announced in open court that he disagreed with the guilty verdict that had just been delivered by the jury forewoman.

Expert Analysis

  • 9th Circ. Clarifies ERISA Preemption For Healthcare Industry

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    The Ninth Circuit's recent ruling in Bristol SL Holdings v. Cigna notably clarifies the broad scope of the Employee Retirement Income Security Act's preemption of certain state law causes of action, standing to benefit payors and health plan administrators, say attorneys at Troutman Pepper.

  • Litigation Inspiration: Attys Can Be Heroic Like Olympians

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    Although litigation won’t earn anyone an Olympic medal in Paris this summer, it can be worthy of the same lasting honor if attorneys exercise focused restraint — seeking both their clients’ interests and those of the court — instead of merely pursuing every advantage short of sanctionable conduct, says Bennett Rawicki at Hilgers Graben.

  • Unpacking NY's Revised Hospital Cybersecurity Rule Proposal

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    The New York State Department of Health's recently revised hospital cybersecurity rule proposal highlights increased expectations and scrutiny around cybersecurity in the healthcare sector, while adapting to both recent industry developments and public comments, say Christine Moundas and Gideon Zvi Palte at Ropes & Gray.

  • Short-Term Takeaways From CMS' New Long-Term Care Rules

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    The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services' new final rule on nursing home staffing minimums imposes controversial regulatory challenges that will likely face significant litigation, but for now, stakeholders will need to prepare for increased staffing expectations and more specialized facility assessments without meaningful funding, say attorneys at Morgan Lewis.

  • Updated Federal Rules Can Improve Product Liability MDLs

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    The recent amendment of a federal evidence rule regarding expert testimony and the proposal of a civil rule on managing early discovery in multidistrict legislation hold great promise for promoting the uniform and efficient processes that high-stakes product liability cases particularly need, say Alan Klein and William Heaston at Duane Morris.

  • Lean Into The 'Great Restoration' To Retain Legal Talent

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    As the “great resignation,” in which employees voluntarily left their jobs in droves, has largely dissipated, legal employers should now work toward the idea of a “great restoration,” adopting strategies to effectively hire, onboard and retain top legal talent, says Molly McGrath at Hiring & Empowering Solutions.

  • FDA's Data Monitoring Guidance Reveals Future Expectations

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    As the world of clinical research grows increasingly complex, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's recent draft guidance on the use of data monitoring committees in clinical trials reveals how the agency expects such committees to develop, say Melissa Markey and Carolina Wirth at Hall Render.

  • How Cannabis Rescheduling May Alter Paraphernalia Imports

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    The Biden administration's recent proposal to loosen federal restrictions on marijuana use raises questions about how U.S. Customs and Border Protection enforcement policies may shift when it comes to enforcing a separate federal ban on marijuana accessory imports, says R. Kevin Williams at Clark Hill.

  • FDA Warning Indicates Scrutiny Of Regenerative Health Cos.

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    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration's recent warning letter to Akan Biosciences is a quintessential example of the agency's enforcement priorities for certain products involving human cells and tissues, and highlights ongoing scrutiny placed on manufacturers, say Dominick DiSabatino and Cortney Inman at Sheppard Mullin.

  • New OSHA Memo Helps Clarify Recordkeeping Compliance

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    Based on recent Occupational Safety and Health Administration guidance on whether musculoskeletal disorders are recordable injuries under the agency's recordkeeping regulation, it appears that OSHA may target active release techniques and stretching programs during its inspections, say attorneys at Morgan Lewis.

  • 2 Regulatory Approaches To Psychedelic Clinical Trials

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    Comparing the U.S. and Canada's regulatory frameworks for clinical trials of psychedelic drugs can be useful for designing trial protocols that meet both countries' requirements, which can in turn help diversify patient populations, bolster data robustness and expedite market access, say Kimberly Chew at Husch Blackwell and Sabrina Ramkellawan at AxialBridge.

  • Series

    Fishing Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Atop the list of ways fishing makes me a better lawyer is the relief it offers from the chronic stress of a demanding caseload, but it has also improved my listening skills and patience, and has served as an exceptional setting for building earnest relationships, says Steven DeGeorge​​​​​​​ at Robinson Bradshaw.

  • A Healthier Legal Industry Starts With Emotional Intelligence

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    The legal profession has long been plagued by high rates of mental health issues, in part due to attorneys’ early training and broader societal stereotypes — but developing one’s emotional intelligence is one way to foster positive change, collectively and individually, says attorney Esperanza Franco.

  • To Make Your Legal Writing Clear, Emulate A Master Chef

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    To deliver clear and effective written advocacy, lawyers should follow the model of a fine dining chef — seasoning a foundation of pure facts with punchy descriptors, spicing it up with analogies, refining the recipe and trimming the fat — thus catering to a sophisticated audience of decision-makers, says Reuben Guttman at Guttman Buschner.

  • Circuit Judge Writes An Opinion, AI Helps: What Now?

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    Last week's Eleventh Circuit opinion in Snell v. United Specialty Insurance, notable for a concurrence outlining the use of artificial intelligence to evaluate a term's common meaning, is hopefully the first step toward developing a coherent basis for the judiciary's generative AI use, says David Zaslowsky at Baker McKenzie.

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