White Collar

  • June 12, 2024

    Fund Manager Cops To $3M Fraud Scheme

    A New York fund manager on Wednesday admitted to defrauding investors out of at least $3 million through his investment management firm, in a scheme that has been ongoing for the last three years.

  • June 12, 2024

    Lies At Heart Of Fraud Case Over COVID Test Kits, Jurors Told

    The retrial of a securities fraud case over a COVID test kit deal that never materialized will center on lies, according to opening statements delivered in New Jersey federal court Wednesday.

  • June 12, 2024

    Prosecutor Drops Extortion Case Against Fla. Securities Atty

    A Florida state prosecutor on Wednesday dropped a felony extortion charge against a securities litigation attorney who was accused of threatening to expose an accuser's criminal past if she didn't resign from their condominium board, saying an investigation revealed that there wouldn't be a reasonable likelihood of conviction.

  • June 12, 2024

    Ex-Rehab Biz Manager Gets Prison For Theft From Resident

    The former business manager of a Connecticut rehabilitation center will serve at least nine months in prison for stealing money from an elderly resident's bank account, state prosecutors said.

  • June 12, 2024

    'Tiger-Wolf' Trader Cops To Wire Fraud For $700K Scheme

    A 26-year-old Charlotte man on Wednesday pled guilty to federal prosecutors' claims that he defrauded over 100 would-be investors in his purported hedge fund, Tiger-Wolf Capital LLC, spending much of their money on his own lavish lifestyle.

  • June 12, 2024

    Ex-Navy Employee Pleads Guilty To Contract Bribery Scheme

    Former U.S. Navy civilian official James Soriano has pleaded guilty to accepting bribes from Navy contractors to help steer hundreds of millions of dollars in deals to the companies, after reaching a plea deal with prosecutors.

  • June 12, 2024

    4 Charged In $50M Email, Romance Fraud Schemes

    Four people were charged by Brooklyn federal prosecutors with participating in a series of fraudulent email and romance fraud schemes that resulted in $50 million in losses to the alleged victims.

  • June 12, 2024

    Judge Won't Trim $18M Shareholder Settlement Coverage Suit

    A Pennsylvania federal judge declined to toss certain bad faith allegations against an insurer accused of wrongfully denying coverage for an $18 million settlement between an asset management company and a group of shareholders, adopting a magistrate judge's recommendation that the company sufficiently alleged its claim of bad faith.

  • June 12, 2024

    NY AG, Firms Beat Cuomo Subpoenas In Sex Harassment Suit

    Former New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo can't force Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton LLP and Vladeck Raskin & Clark PC to produce information about an investigation into sexual misconduct accusations that forced him to resign, a federal judge ruled Wednesday, finding the firms were acting under the state attorney general's authority.

  • June 12, 2024

    2 Men Get Prison For Plot To Sell Iranian Oil To China

    Two men convicted for their role in a scheme to sell Iranian oil to a Chinese company have been sentenced to nearly four years in prison each, according to the U.S. Attorney's Office for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania.

  • June 12, 2024

    House Votes To Hold AG Garland In Contempt

    The House voted 216-207 on Wednesday to hold Attorney General Merrick Garland in contempt for not turning over audio recordings of the president and his ghostwriter speaking with special counsel Robert Hur for his investigation into Biden's handling of classified documents.

  • June 12, 2024

    Transit Insurer Seeks To Limit Loss From $60M No-Fault Scam

    A taxi and livery insurer told a Brooklyn federal judge Wednesday that it is pursuing settlement in its effort to recoup $3.2 million lost in a massive, $60 million no-fault scam led by a former clinic operator now headed for prison.

  • June 12, 2024

    St. Louis Atty Urges Acquittal After Tax Avoidance Conviction

    A Missouri attorney who was found guilty of participating in a $4 million tax avoidance scheme alongside her father and a North Carolina insurance agent is looking to wipe out the verdict, arguing there wasn't enough evidence to convict.

  • June 12, 2024

    Terraform To Settle With SEC For $4.5B After Fraud Trial

    Crypto firm Terraform Labs has agreed to a $4.47 billion settlement with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission after a Manhattan jury found the firm and its founder Do Kwon liable for fraud in April.

  • June 12, 2024

    Federal Jurist In Chicago Remembered As 'Favorite Judge'

    Senior U.S. District Judge Harry D. Leinenweber, who oversaw the criminal trials of R. Kelly and the "ComEd Four" during his four decades on the bench in Illinois, is remembered as a compassionate "favorite judge" whose tireless work ethic kept him active in the court until his death Tuesday.

  • June 12, 2024

    House Dems Seek Criminal Penalties For PE Hospital 'Looters'

    A pair of Democratic senators are targeting private equity's role in the healthcare industry, introducing new legislation Tuesday that would give federal and state enforcers new tools to go after firms they say are "looting" hospital systems and other providers, including possibly jailing executives if patient deaths result.

  • June 12, 2024

    Norton Rose Adds 12 BCLP Attys In Denver, St. Louis

    Norton Rose Fulbright has added a dozen attorneys from Bryan Cave Leighton Paisner LLP to its regulatory, investigations, securities and compliance practice in the firm's Denver and St. Louis offices.

  • June 12, 2024

    Judge Tells Embezzling Atty To Focus As Sentencing Looms

    An Illinois federal judge on Wednesday again denied a former attorney's bid for a new trial or pre-sentencing release after a jury convicted him of misappropriating a now-shuttered bank's embezzled funds, saying he should concentrate on his upcoming sentencing instead.

  • June 12, 2024

    Mich. Atty Gets Life In Prison For Arranging Client's Murder

    A Michigan attorney convicted of plotting to kill a wealthy client to gain access to his trust was sentenced Wednesday to life in prison without the opportunity for parole, and a judge said the lawyer viewed those around him as merely opportunities to profit.

  • June 12, 2024

    FBI Told OneTaste Witness To Delete Evidence, Ex-Execs Say

    Two former executives of sexual wellness company OneTaste Inc. said they uncovered "shocking" evidence that an FBI agent told a former employee of the business and key government witness to delete an old email account, allegedly destroying exculpatory evidence in a forced-labor conspiracy case.

  • June 12, 2024

    Ex-Supreme Court Clerk, Federal Atty Joins McGuireWoods

    McGuireWoods LLP announced the addition of another former federal prosecutor to its ranks on Wednesday, this time a product liability expert from Perkins Coie LLP who advises companies on various disputes and government investigations.

  • June 12, 2024

    Bannon Looks To Avoid Prison Amid Contempt Appeals

    Donald Trump ally Stephen Bannon wants the D.C. Circuit to put off his four-month prison sentence for contempt of Congress while he continues to challenge the conviction, contending that the case is likely to pique the interest of the U.S. Supreme Court.

  • June 12, 2024

    First 'Survivor' Winner Wants $3M Tax Case Tossed

    The winner of the first season of the TV series "Survivor" asked a Rhode Island federal court to toss the government's case against him seeking nearly $3.3 million in unpaid taxes, saying the liabilities stem from his flawed criminal conviction for tax evasion nearly 20 years ago.

  • June 11, 2024

    Amplitude Execs Face Suit Over Post-IPO Share Inflation

    Current and former insiders of business software maker Amplitude were hit with a shareholder derivative suit claiming they profited from misrepresentations they made about the likelihood of the company sustaining its revenue growth following its initial public offering.

  • June 11, 2024

    Witness Takes Heat Off Menendez's Wife In Bribery Trial

    A key cooperator helping make federal prosecutors' bribery case against U.S. Sen. Bob Menendez admitted Tuesday he has no reason to think the senator's wife held up her end of a supposed deal to exert influence on the senator in exchange for a much-discussed Mercedes.

Expert Analysis

  • Litigation Inspiration: Attys Can Be Heroic Like Olympians

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    Although litigation won’t earn anyone an Olympic medal in Paris this summer, it can be worthy of the same lasting honor if attorneys exercise focused restraint — seeking both their clients’ interests and those of the court — instead of merely pursuing every advantage short of sanctionable conduct, says Bennett Rawicki at Hilgers Graben.

  • Lean Into The 'Great Restoration' To Retain Legal Talent

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    As the “great resignation,” in which employees voluntarily left their jobs in droves, has largely dissipated, legal employers should now work toward the idea of a “great restoration,” adopting strategies to effectively hire, onboard and retain top legal talent, says Molly McGrath at Hiring & Empowering Solutions.

  • 9th Circ. Ruling Shows Lies Must Go To Nature Of Bargain

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    The Ninth Circuit’s recent U.S. v. Milheiser decision, vacating six mail fraud convictions, clarifies that the key question in federal fraud cases is not whether lies were told, but what they were told about — thus requiring defense counsel to rethink their strategies, say Charles Kreindler and Krista Landis at Sheppard Mullin.

  • How Cannabis Rescheduling May Alter Paraphernalia Imports

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    The Biden administration's recent proposal to loosen federal restrictions on marijuana use raises questions about how U.S. Customs and Border Protection enforcement policies may shift when it comes to enforcing a separate federal ban on marijuana accessory imports, says R. Kevin Williams at Clark Hill.

  • Opinion

    New Guidance On Guilty Plea Withdrawals Is Long Past Due

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    In light of the Sentencing Reform Act's 40th anniversary, adding a new section to the accompanying guidelines on the withdrawal of guilty pleas could remedy the lack of direction in this area and improve the regulation's effectiveness in promoting sentencing uniformity, say Mark H. Allenbaugh at SentencingStats.com and Alan Ellis at the Law Offices of Alan Ellis.

  • Boeing Saga Underscores Need For Ethical Corporate Culture

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    In the wake of recent allegations about Boeing’s safety culture, and amid the U.S. Department of Justice’s new whistleblower incentives, business leaders should reinvigorate their emphasis on compliance by making clear that long-term profitability requires ethical business practices, says Maxwell Carr-Howard at Dentons.

  • Key Takeaways From 2024 Accountants' Liability Conference

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    At the recent annual Accountants' Liability Conference, regulators provided important commentary on new Public Company Accounting Oversight Board rulemaking and standard-setting initiatives, and emphasized regulatory priorities ranging from the tone at the top to alternative practice structures, say attorneys at Arnold & Porter.

  • Why Jurors Balk At 'I Don't Recall' — And How To Respond

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    Jurors often react negatively to a witness who responds “I don’t remember” because they tend to hold erroneous beliefs about the nature of human memory, but attorneys can adopt a few strategies to mitigate the impact of these biases, say Steve Wood and Ava Hernández at Courtroom Sciences.

  • Series

    Fishing Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Atop the list of ways fishing makes me a better lawyer is the relief it offers from the chronic stress of a demanding caseload, but it has also improved my listening skills and patience, and has served as an exceptional setting for building earnest relationships, says Steven DeGeorge​​​​​​​ at Robinson Bradshaw.

  • 10 Tips To Build Trust With Your Witness During Trial Prep

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    Preparing a witness for deposition or trial requires more than just legal skills — lawyers must also work to cultivate trust with the witness, using strategies ranging from wearing a hat when conducting mock cross-examination to offering them a ride to court before they testify, say Faye Paul Teller and Sara McDermott at Munger Tolles.

  • A Healthier Legal Industry Starts With Emotional Intelligence

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    The legal profession has long been plagued by high rates of mental health issues, in part due to attorneys’ early training and broader societal stereotypes — but developing one’s emotional intelligence is one way to foster positive change, collectively and individually, says attorney Esperanza Franco.

  • To Make Your Legal Writing Clear, Emulate A Master Chef

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    To deliver clear and effective written advocacy, lawyers should follow the model of a fine dining chef — seasoning a foundation of pure facts with punchy descriptors, spicing it up with analogies, refining the recipe and trimming the fat — thus catering to a sophisticated audience of decision-makers, says Reuben Guttman at Guttman Buschner.

  • 8 Steps Companies Should Take After An Internal Investigation

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    Given the U.S. Department of Justice’s increasing focus on corporate compliance and remediation of misconduct, companies must follow through in several key ways after an internal investigation to ensure history does not repeat itself, say Jonathan Aronie and Joseph Jay at Sheppard Mullin.

  • Circuit Judge Writes An Opinion, AI Helps: What Now?

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    Last week's Eleventh Circuit opinion in Snell v. United Specialty Insurance, notable for a concurrence outlining the use of artificial intelligence to evaluate a term's common meaning, is hopefully the first step toward developing a coherent basis for the judiciary's generative AI use, says David Zaslowsky at Baker McKenzie.

  • NY Public Campaign Funding May Attract Scrutiny From Feds

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    The upcoming elections across New York this year will be the first under the state’s public campaign finance program — which may broaden federal prosecutors' purview to target state election fraud and corruption, says Jarrod Schaeffer at Abell Eskew.

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